When Does ICT-Enabled Citizen Voice Lead to Government Responsiveness?

When Does ICT-Enabled Citizen  Voice Lead to Government   Responsiveness?

Around the world, civil society organisations (CSOs) and governments are experimenting with information communication technology (ICT) platforms that try to encourage and project citizen voice, with the goal of improving public service delivery. This meta-analysis focuses on empirical studies of initiatives in the global South, highlighting both citizen uptake (‘yelp’) and the degree to which public service providers respond to expressions of citizen voice (‘teeth’). The conceptual framework is informed by the key distinction between two distinct genres of ICT-enabled citizen voice – aggregated individual assessments of service provision and collective civic action. The first approach constitutes user feedback, providing precise information in real time to decisionmakers. This allows policymakers and programme managers to identify and address service delivery problems – but at their discretion.

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Social Accountability: What Does the Evidence Really Say?

Social Accountability: What Does the Evidence Really Say?

Empirical evidence of tangible impacts of social accountability initiatives is mixed. This meta-analysis reinterprets evaluations through a new lens: the distinction between tactical and strategic approaches to the promotion of citizen voice to contribute to improved public sector performance. Field experiments study bounded, tactical interventions based on optimistic assumptions about the power of information alone, both to motivate collective action and to influence the state. Enabling environments for collective action combined with bolstered state capacity to respond to citizen voice are more promising. Sandwich strategies can help ‘voice’ and ‘teeth’ to become mutually empowering, through state–society synergy.

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Power to the People: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment of a Community-Based Monitoring Project in Uganda

Strengthening the relationship of accountability between health service providers and citizens is by many people viewed as critical for improving access to and quality of health care. How this is to be achieved, and whether it works, however, remain open questions.

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From Corporate Governance to Local Governance: Stakeholder‐Driven Community Score‐Cards for UK Local Agencies?

This paper compares the methodology of the “comprehensive performance assessment”, recently proposed by the Audit Commission for all UK local authorities, with the “community score‐card” approach which has been used in the United States of America for a number of years. It suggests that the Audit Commission approach should be altered to take on board some of the more imaginative aspects of the community score‐card, particularly in relation to the inclusion of those quality of life measures, which local people regard as important, and measures of the quality of local governance.

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The political economy of community scorecards in Malawi

This article covers the use and basic functions of the community scorecard process. It draws on lessons from the community-based monitoring project implemented by Plan Malawi, ActionAid and the Council for Non Governmental Organisations of Malawi (CONGOMA). It covers the methodological approach, steps and decision-making levels at which it is used. It also examines the successes and challenges – and how innovation has been used to surmount them.

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CARE’s experience with Community Score Cards: What works and why? - synthesis report

CARE’s experience with Community Score Cards: What works and why? - synthesis report

This synthesis report gives detailed information and findings from research into the experience of CARE International in implementing Community Score Card programmes in four countries – Ethiopia, Malawi, Tanzania and Rwanda. The report aims to address the significant research gap around cross-country comparative analysis of social accountability programmes.

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