Emerging Impacts in Open Data in the Judiciary Branches in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay

Emerging Impacts in Open Data in the Judiciary Branches in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay

The majority of Open Government Data (OGD) initiatives around the world have focussed on the executive branches of government, exploring financial, infrastructure and administrative datasets. A smaller number have looked at legislative open data. However, open data in the judicial branch has gone relatively unexplored. In this study, CIPPEC explore the the openness of judiciary branch data and it’s impact through a comparative study across three Latin American countries. The study used a layered mixed-method exploratory design, triangulating findings from a technical assessment of data judiciary websites, interviews with key informants and field-work. The study worked through descriptive, diagnostic, analytical and prospective phases, in order to generate robust policy-relevant recommendations.

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Open Data and Sub-national Governments: Lessons from Developing Countries

Open Data and Sub-national Governments: Lessons from Developing Countries

Open government data (OGD) as a concept is gaining currency globally due to the strong advocacy of global organisations as Open Government Partnership. In recent years, there has been increased commitment on the part of national governments to proactively disclose information.

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A Comparison of Tablet-Based and Paper-Based Survey Data Collection in Conservation Projects

A Comparison of Tablet-Based and Paper-Based Survey Data Collection in Conservation Projects

There is growing use of household surveys by conservation organizations as they seek to measure the social impacts of conservation initiatives, especially in developing countries. Several recent health-sector studies suggest that computer-aided personal interviewing may be a cheaper and faster alternative to the traditional paper-based interviewing.

Here, a comparison of The Nature Conservancy-funded tablet computer-based and paper-based household surveys is presented. Because the tablet and paper surveys were not identical except for the data collection tool, the results are suggestive. In the comparison, the cost per completed interview for the tablet-based survey was 74% less than the paper-based survey average, and the average time per interview question for the tablet-based survey was 46% less than the paper-based survey average.

The cost saving came primarily from less need for data cleaning and lower enumerator fees. The time saving came primarily from faster data entry. The results suggest that there may be substantial savings in costs and time when using tablets rather than paper for survey data collection in a developing country.

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